All in Features

Are long games hurting the medium?

I’m not exactly sure where the mindset originated (though if I had to guess I’d say with young people without a large income), but for a large segment of the gaming community a game’s length is often viewed as one of the deciding factors in whether they decide to purchase/play it. It seems absurd to me, as after all nobody says they only read books that are over 1000 pages or albums with more than 20 tracks, but for whatever reason games are uniquely singled out as being required to provide dozens and dozens of hours of content, or else be written off as a poor value or even somehow degrading games as a whole with their meager offering.

Indie Impressions: Fantastic Witch Collective (Adventure Demo)

Firstly, I'd just like to take a moment to recognize that Fantastic Witch Collective as a name for anything is already pretty brilliant. That that something happens to be a delightful 16-bit RPG from indie developer, Lulu Blue, only makes it more, well, fantastic, and though it's still incredibly early in development, the little I've played of FWC has me convinced it's going to live up to its title.

How itch.io is different and why they're important

itch.io is the latest of these, or at least the one I’ve been hearing about the most. It’s a site dedicated to independent games with a focus on developers and flexible monetization. It doesn’t sound too radical when you put it that way, but as I dug deeper into the site, I began to see how itch.io drastically differs from other distribution platforms; in ways that significantly alter the message the site seems to driven by, and the impression I got of how it chose to present it. Though in some ways the site still feels as if it's in its infancy, these differences are exciting and noteworthy enough to warrant discussing.

Indie Impressions: Master Spy (Alpha Demo)

My biggest concern would be how Turbogun balances its difficulty as later levels become more complex, but the small slice I experienced has me eager to see where the project heads. Even with my limited exposure to the game, there's a clear feeling that Master Spy knows what it wants to do, and even if it doesn't quite achieve its goals I have no doubt it will still get there with ample amounts of style.

The problems with F2P and how Hearthstone solved them

I’ll be the first to admit that I cringe a bit anytime someone tells me about a free-to-play game. It’s a reaction I’ve seen among a lot of people lately, and it’s frustrating because I don’t think F2P as a monetization system is inherently bad. In fact, I feel it’s the inevitable and ideal future of a lot of games, allowing for greater financial success and longevity for developers, and the ability for players to try a game before spending a dime in a way demos can’t provide.